Puppets Casey and Finnegan

Judith Lawrence with puppets Casey and Finnegan on Hornby Island. Grant Lawrence (no relation), Canadian broadcaster, and son Josh visited her. Photo by Jill Barber

Judith Lawrence with her puppets Casey and Finnegan on Hornby Island.
Grant Lawrence (no relation), Canadian broadcaster, and son Josh visited her.
Photo by Jill Barber

Puppets Casey and Finnegan
alive and well on Hornby Island
Adapted by cbc.ca by Nancy Carson
Level 2

Listen to Casey and Finnegan– Level 2
Reading by Jessica Heafey

For 27 years, a little child and a dog
made many Canadian children very happy.
Casey, the child, and Finnegan,
the dog, were puppets.
They were part of a CBC Television show.
The show was called “Mr. Dressup”.
Mr. Dressup was a man called Ernie Coombs.
The puppeteer was Judith Lawrence.

Mr. Dressup with Casey and Finnegan Photo by Wikipedia Casey and Finnegan

Mr. Dressup with Casey and Finnegan
Photo by Wikipedia

Casey and Finnegan
No one knew if Casey was a boy or a girl.
Judith knew that both boys
and girls watched the show.
Judith said kids asked her,
“Is Casey a boy or a girl?
“Well, what do you think?” she replied.
If children said “girl”, Judith said “yes”.
If they said “boy”, Judith said “yes.”
Finnegan did not speak.
He whispered to Casey and then
Casey said Finnegan’s words. Continue reading

B.C. man’s harpsichords

Craig Tomlinson sitting at one of his harpsichords Photo by Mike Wakefield

Craig Tomlinson sitting at one of his harpsichords
Photo by Mike Wakefield/The Northshore News

B.C. man’s harpsichords used around the world
Adapted from The Northshore News by Nancy Carson
Level 3

Craig Tomlinson was 16 and living in Coquitlam.
It was the 1960s and folk music
was very  popular again.
Many folk musicians played the dulcimer.*
Tomlinson looked everywhere for one.
*dul-si-mer

Dulcimers Photo by Rob Swystun/CC, Flickr

Dulcimers
Photo by Rob Swystun/CC, Flickr

Never gave up
Tomlinson said, “You could just not buy them anywhere.”
But the young man did not give up.
He thought, “What the heck,
I’ve got a picture of one, I’ll build one.”
He built many of the four-stringed instruments
and could soon build one in less than a week.

New Challenge
Tomlinson wanted a new challenge,
so he built a more difficult instrument.
He began building harpsichords
which can have up to 200 strings.
He makes them in his small workshop
behind his West Vancouver home.
Harpsichords had become popular in the 1950s
when baroque music became popular again.

Craig Tomlinson in his West Vancouver studio Photo – Courtesy of Craig Tomlinson

Craig Tomlinson in his West Vancouver studio
Photo – Courtesy of Craig Tomlinson

A French harpsichord made by Craig Tomlinson Photo – Courtesy of Craig Tomlinson

A French harpsichord made by Craig Tomlinson
Photo – Courtesy of Craig Tomlinson

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UBC program helps ex-soldiers

Participants in the Veterans Transition Program re-enact experiences from their military service. Photo by Martin Dee, UBC Public Affairs.

Participants in the Veterans Transition Program
re-enact experiences from their military service.
Photo by Martin Dee, UBC Public Affairs

Adapted from WE Vancouver by Nancy Carson
Level 3
(The videos in the links are highly recommended.)

A program at the University of British Columbia (UBC)
is helping soldiers return to civilian life.
These soldiers are called veterans.
Other programs help veterans heal soldier’s bodies.
But the Veterans Transition Program (VTP)
helps heal their hearts and minds as well.
People attend in a group and work together.
Dr. Marvin Westwood and Dr. David Kuhl
developed VTP in 1999.


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