Coyotes are moving to the cities, too

Stan Gehrt holds a female coyote captured in Chicago. Photo courtesy of Stan Geht

Stan Gehrt holds a female coyote captured in Chicago.
Photo courtesy of Stan Geht

Adapted from The Vancouver Sun

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Coyotes are moving to the cities.
And they are staying in these cities.
Why are they moving?
They want to raise healthy pups.
They want to eat well.
They do not want to go back to nature.
They’re living a few metres from people
every day and every night.


About coyotes
Coyotes, wolves and dogs are in the same family.
They like to live close to forests.
Their habitat is disappearing. Why?
People are building homes near the coyotes.
So it is hard for coyotes to find food.
So coyotes come to the cities.
They find “easy pickings” there.
Easy pickings means food is easy to find.

Coyote howling in the wild Public Domain

Coyote howling in the wild
Public Domain

Coyotes in B.C.
There are about 2,000 to 3,000 coyotes
living near Vancouver.
Coyotes eat almost anything.
For example, they eat mice, rats, and squirrels.
They eat rabbits, eggs, turtles, fish and insects.
They eat garbage, compost, and
seeds from bird feeders, too.
They will eat any food left outside.

Coyote with a squirrel in Stanley Park Photo by Michael Schmidt/ Stanley Park Ecology Society

Coyote with a squirrel in Stanley Park
Photo by Michael Schmidt/ Stanley Park Ecology Society

Coyotes are helpful
There are too many Canada geese in some places.
Coyotes help this problem.
They eat the eggs of Canada geese.

Coyotes and people
In nature, coyotes are afraid of people.
So coyotes move around at night.
They move around at dawn and dusk, too.
People should not leave any food outside.
People should never feed coyotes.
Wild animals need to find their own food.
Wild animals need to be afraid of people.
We do not want coyotes close to pets.
We do not want coyotes hunting in the daytime.

A study in Chicago
Stanley Gehrt studies coyotes in the U.S.
He put radio tags on 200 coyotes.
The studies surprised scientists.
The study showed hundreds of coyotes are
living in one city.
Gehrt now knows that city coyotes live longer.
Coyotes can walk a long way.
One coyote in the study went to five cities in one night!

A coyote in Stanley Park is not afraid of people. Photo by Michael Schmidt/ Stanley Park Ecology Society

A coyote in Stanley Park is not afraid of people.
Photo by Michael Schmidt/ Stanley Park Ecology Society

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