Meals on two wheels

meals-on-wheels-vancouver

Volunteer Jason Lescak takes hot lunches to seniors
in Vancouver.
Photo courtesy of Health and Home Care Society of BC

Meals on two wheels
Adapted from The Vancouver Courier by Nancy Carson
Level  3

Meals on Wheels started in 1967
in Vancouver and Richmond.
This program brings hot lunches
to people’s homes.
Volunteers in their cars
deliver more than 400 meals.
They do this from Monday to Friday
between 11 a.m. and 1:00 p.m.
Volunteers also stop for a friendly visit.

Health and Home Care Society of B.C.
Care B.C. delivers meals
to many kinds of people at home.
People recovering from injury, illness
or surgery can get meals.
Seniors and people with serious
medical problems can also receive meals.
Some people need help
for just a short time.

A client is happy to see his meal and the volunteer.  Photo by Don Erhardt Photography

A client is happy to see his meal and the volunteer.
Photo by Don Erhardt Photography

Western meals
People can order western meals.
They can choose meat or no-meat dishes.
Soup and dessert comes with these meals.
They can get sandwiches
and different frozen meals.
Menus change every four weeks.

Beef stew Photo by Ogiyoshisan/CC, Flickr

Beef stew
Photo by Ogiyoshisan/CC, Flickr

Chinese Meals on Wheels
Now people can order Chinese meals.
This service started in 1996.
Last year, Care B.C. delivered
more than 111,000 Western and Chinese meals
to Vancouver and Richmond residents.
A hot Western meal costs $6.25.
Meals from the Chinese menu are $6.50.

A Chinese meal from Meals on Wheels Photo by Don Erhardt Photography

A Chinese meal from Meals on Wheels
Photo by Don Erhardt Photography

Meals on two wheels
Five years ago, volunteers on bicycles
started to deliver meals.
This new program is called Meals on Bikes.
Every bike helps keep Vancouver green.
Parking for bikes is easier to find.
A rider can easily take
six to eight meals on a bike.
And some people live close to
each other in apartment buildings.

The bike volunteers like to be active
while they work.
Volunteers with no bike
can get one from the society,
with a basket for carrying meals.

Volunteer Jason Lescak
Lescak can ride from eight
to 15 kilometres in a day.
He likes to ride his bike
when he volunteers.
“I enjoy hearing about people’s stories
from when they were younger,” he says.
“I also enjoy the humour and
view of the world that some
of the clients have.”

Care B.C.
Care B.C. was started by nurses
working in the Yukon
over 100 years ago.
It had a different name then.
This society helps seniors
to live independently.

Links:

1. Health and Home Care Society of B.C.’s meal program
2  Better Meals, a home-delivery service