Puppets Casey and Finnegan

Judith Lawrence with puppets Casey and Finnegan on Hornby Island. Grant Lawrence (no relation), Canadian broadcaster, and son Josh visited her. Photo by Jill Barber

Judith Lawrence with her puppets Casey and Finnegan on Hornby Island.
Grant Lawrence (no relation), Canadian broadcaster, and son Josh visited her.
Photo by Jill Barber

Puppets Casey and Finnegan
alive and well on Hornby Island
Adapted by cbc.ca by Nancy Carson
Level 2

Listen to Casey and Finnegan– Level 2
Reading by Jessica Heafey

For 27 years, a little child and a dog
made many Canadian children very happy.
Casey, the child, and Finnegan,
the dog, were puppets.
They were part of a CBC Television show.
The show was called “Mr. Dressup”.
Mr. Dressup was a man called Ernie Coombs.
The puppeteer was Judith Lawrence.

Mr. Dressup with Casey and Finnegan Photo by Wikipedia Casey and Finnegan

Mr. Dressup with Casey and Finnegan
Photo by Wikipedia

Casey and Finnegan
No one knew if Casey was a boy or a girl.
Judith knew that both boys
and girls watched the show.
Judith said kids asked her,
“Is Casey a boy or a girl?
“Well, what do you think?” she replied.
If children said “girl”, Judith said “yes”.
If they said “boy”, Judith said “yes.”
Finnegan did not speak.
He whispered to Casey and then
Casey said Finnegan’s words. Continue reading

Dyeing brown grass green

dyeing-grass-green-water-restrictions

Craig Lundy watches as Kyle McDiarmid makes brown grass green.
Photo by Ric Ernst/The Province

Dyeing brown grass green
Adapted from The Province and The Vancouver Courier by Nila Gopaul
Level 2

The weather is very dry this summer.
Lawns are turning brown.
There are water restrictions all over B.C.

These lawns are not dead.
They will turn green again in the fall
with the rain.

Some people do not like
brown lawns.
They think the colour is ugly.
They think the grass is dead.

Now these people can have green lawns
without using water.
More than 20 companies in B.C.
can turn lawns green.
Some companies say they use
non-toxic dye.
They say the dye is safe for
children and pets.

“This is a multi-million-dollar business
in California,
because of the severe drought,” says Craig Lundy.
He operates Imperial Painting
with his wife.
The couple dyes many lawns.

Movies sets and realtors have used
this dye for many years.
The colour lasts up to 12 weeks.
The cost? About $250 on average.

Canada’s first aboriginal arts hotel

Skwachàys-Lodge-aboriginal arts hotel

The front of Skwachàys Lodge
Photo – Jenelle Schneider/The Vancouver Sun

Canada’s first aboriginal arts hotel
Adapted from The Vancouver Sun by Nila Gopaul
Level 3

Skwachàys* Lodge
in Vancouver is Canada’s
first aboriginal arts hotel.
The lodge has 18 rooms.
*say:  skywatch-eyes

Six aboriginal artists and six
designers worked on the rooms.
Each room tells a different story.
Rooms start at $99/night.

Guests can experience
aboriginal culture.
They can visit the art gallery
and sweat lodge.
The kitchen serves foods from
different First Nations.

The Vancouver Native Housing Society
owns and runs the hotel.
There are also 24 apartments
for aboriginal artists.

Links:

  1. Learn about more about the hotel (video).
  2. See inside the hotel here (lodge website).