Tracing fish

A teacher in Kenya eats fish for his lunch. The fish was caught in the ocean next to a nearby city. Do you know where your fish comes from? Photo by Nancy Carson

A teacher in Kenya eats fish for his lunch. The fish was caught in the ocean
next to a nearby city. Do you know where your fish comes from?
Photo by Nancy Carson

Adapted from The Vancouver Sun

Level 3

People want to know where their meat comes from.
Some also want to know where chickens are raised.
Now you can find out where your fish comes from.

“This Fish”
A small Canadian website called This Fish can help.
Ecotrust Canada started a fish tracing tool in 2010.
This Fish is in 29 Thrifty Foods stores in B.C.
It is also used in Bruce’s Country Market in Coquitlam.

Read the PDF.

How it works
Seafood in this program will have a code on a tag.
This code can be uploaded to www.thisfish.info.
You can find out who caught it.
You will know how it was caught.
As well, you can see pictures of the fishermen and their boats.
You can even send notes to the fishermen!

A useful tool
So far, people have looked for more than 362,500 fish.
These tagged fish go to 540 cities around the world.
Most of these fish are still in Canada.
People from the U.S., Europe and Africa buy fish from B.C.
Dan Edwards, a commercial fisherman from Ucluelet, B.C.,
has been in the program since 2007.
This was the year the program first started.

It’s easy
Eric Tamm, of Vancouver’s This Fish program, says,
“You take the unique code home
and discover the story of your seafood.”
This is a different kind of “fish story”.
This one is true.

Midori salmon recipe by Karen Barnaby Photo by Gerry Kahrmann, The Vancouver Sun

Midori salmon recipe by Karen Barnaby
Photo by Gerry Kahrmann, The Vancouver Sun

Bar code on a bottle Photo by lowellbellew, Flickr

Bar code on a bottle
Photo by lowellbellew, Flickr