Summer sun safety

summer-sun-safety

Two women chat and enjoy the sun.
Photo by: Dana/CC, Flickr

Summer sun safety
Story adapted from HealthLink BC by Patti-Lea Ryan
Edited by Nila Gopaul
Level 2

It is fun to sit or play in the sun.
But, too much sun can be harmful.
We can get sunburned on cloudy days, too.
Too much heat can lead to health problems.
People can get stroke, heat exhaustion,
skin cancer, or eye disease.

Protect your children and yourself in the sun
Good news!
There are easy ways
to protect your children and yourself.
Try to stay indoors between 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
This time is when the sun is the hottest.

When you are outside, sit under trees.
Children need shady areas to play.
If you cannot keep out of the sun,
use “sun smart” clothing and sunscreen.

A family in shade Photo by NCinDC/CC, Flickr

A family in the shade
Photo by NCinDC/CC, Flickr

Sun smart clothing
Cover up with clothes
that you cannot see through.
Long sleeved shirts and pants protect skin.
Wide brim hats are very good protection.
Try to get one that covers your neck.
Most baseball caps do not cover necks.

A woman wears a wide brim hat in the sun. Photo by Ron Wiecki/CC, Flickr

A woman wears a wide brim hat in the sun.
Photo by Ron Wiecki/CC, Flickr

Sunscreen
Buy a sunscreen with SPF 30 or more.
Use a lip balm of SPF 30 too.
Apply every 2 of hours.
Swimmers should use a waterproof sunscreen.
Make sure that sunscreen is applied shoulders,
backs, arms and legs.

Apply it to the face, nose and ears.
Be careful near the eyes. Sunscreen can sting.
Under the edges of bathing suits is a good idea.
Do not forget the tops
of feet and the backs of knees.

A boy gets sunscreen on his face, ears and neck. Photo by Take A Hike Arizona/CC, Flickr

A boy gets sunscreen on his face, ears and neck.
Photo by Take A Hike Arizona/CC, Flickr

Eyes need protection too
Look for sunglasses that provide
99 to 100 percent UVA and UVB protection.

Try them on to see
how well they cover your eyes.
Large lenses help protect against sun rays.

UV Protected sunglasses Photo by Roxanna Salceda/CC, Flickr

A woman wears UV-protected sunglasses.
Photo by Roxanna Salceda/CC, Flickr

Vocabulary

1.  Heat exhaustion: the body is over heated causing sickness
2.  SPF: Sun Protection Factor
3.  UVA: (say – ul-tra-vi-yo-let); Ultra Violet A are harmful Ultra Violet rays.
4.  UVB: Ultra Violet B (not as strong as UVA)

 Wishing you a safe and happy summer!

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